Kikuyu Town Faces Massive Demolition As The Southern Bypass Approaches

A Large number of structures on the road reserve bear the dreaded "X" mark meant for demolition. Construction works for the bypass are slowly inching closer to the township.

Kikuyu Town. The extents of this image shows the path of the bypass as it enters the town.

Kikuyu Town. The extents of this image shows the path of the bypass as it enters the town.

The Nairobi Southern Bypass is the last bypass under construction and also the widest.It features a dual carriageway with additional service lanes and is expected to ease the transportation crisis on Uhuru Highway due to the heavy commercial vehicles (HCV) on the road. It will offer an alternative path for this and other drivers who wish to access Nakuru highway without entering the city. It spans from Likoni Road on Mombasa Road at Ole Sereni Hotel to Kikuyu. Despite the occasional land acquisition that occurs on many road projects in the country, this project has managed to shake off these are move ahead. The contractor is moving ahead with the other sections and works on the ground are impressive.

A house marked for destruction. Most houses like these have been vacated by the owners.

A house marked for destruction. Most houses like these have been vacated by the owners.

The Government has funded 15 per cent of the project and the remaining percentage is a concession loan from Exim Bank China at a 2 per cent interest rate, which is really cheap - KeNHA Project Manager, Paul Omondi (Standard Media)

The dual carriage way road will enter Kikuyu township to later join the Nairobi - Nakuru highway and this is the problem. The small town which used to serves as a railway station is in the brink of demolition as the massive Southern Bypass approaches. Kikuyu town has most of its structures which are along the main highway earmarked for demolition, paving way for the junction with the bypass. However despite this extensive demolition, many residents are pleased citing development will come to the area once the bypass is complete. Still, there are some who are sceptical.

The Southern Bypass as it approaches Kikuyu town at Ondiri Swamp

The Southern Bypass as it approaches Kikuyu town at Ondiri Swamp

Away from the town area, at the Ondiri Swamp, construction workers battle the midday sun as they complete the large box culvert facilitating continuous flow to the swamp drainage.Its from here that the bypass will enter the Kikuyu town after much of the permanent living houses are demolished. An extensive valley spans between the lsat point of construction and Kikuyu town. Most of these dwellings are abandoned with some opting to salvage the construction materials before the contractors' bulldozers arrive. Among the affected residents in a school, hard-wares, churches and a standalone latrine. Also a railway line will face disruption but will be restored after roadworks are completed.

The famous 121m long box culvert at Ondiri Swamp

The famous 121m long box culvert at Ondiri Swamp

Upclose view of the culvert. A person can walk inside the culvert.

Upclose view of the culvert. A person can walk inside the culvert.

Facing Kikuyu Town from a distance.

Facing Kikuyu Town from a distance.

Kenya National Highways Authority is incharge of the KShs. 17.1 billion bypass. The government has funded 15% of the project with the rest being a concession loan from Exim Bank. The bypass spans 28.6km and is expected to remove trucks from Uhuru Highway.
The road will pass over Mombasa Road from Likoni Road, where a full cover-leaf interchange is under construction, then crosses the National Park westward and goes through Langata, Ngong, Dagoretti and Thogoto roads and thereafter passes over Ondiri Swamp and railway line towards Kikuyu town. The use of cover interchange will be the first in Kenya. Cars passing through the interchanges will not have to stop and wait for others from the other direction to pass. It will be an express way for all cars.

Excerpts from: Standard Media